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This technology can now be tested with blood samples

Nov 18, 2019

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Researchers use a biophysical approach to simulate what might happen to blood in a patient's vascular network. This technology can now be tested with blood samples and will be integrated into other extracorporeal devices through which the patient's blood flows in the future to provide doctors with predictive capabilities to help prevent thrombosis or internal bleeding.
In this study, the research team developed a microfluidic device through which blood flows like a small network of blood vessels flowing through the body. With automated pressure sensors and a proprietary set of algorithms, the data acquired by the device can be analyzed in real time, * predicting when a particular blood sample will block the vascular network.
The hollow tube of the device mimics the pathological features of narrowing of small blood vessels. This pathological phenomenon can occur as a side effect of some disease treatment drugs or methods in patients, often causing hemodynamic changes, which may lead to serious Life-threatening thrombosis or internal bleeding. Therefore, for some high-risk patients, it is very important to quickly detect the patient's healthy hemostasis and prevent thrombosis.
The researchers said that using this microfluidic device to simulate the hemodynamics of small blood vessels combined with * data analysis software can quickly quantify the patient's hemostatic capacity in real time, predict whether blood samples or patients will form a thrombus.

Researchers use a biophysical Infusion mould Manufacturers to simulate what might happen to blood in a patient's vascular network. This technology can now be tested with blood samples and will be integrated into other extracorporeal devices through which the patient's blood flows in the future to provide doctors with predictive capabilities to help prevent thrombosis or internal bleeding.

 

In this study, the research team developed a microfluidic device through which blood flows like a small network of blood vessels flowing through the body. With automated pressure sensors and a proprietary set of algorithms, the data acquired by the device can be analyzed in real time, * predicting when a particular blood sample will block the vascular network.

 

The hollow tube of the device mimics the pathological features of narrowing of small blood vessels. This pathological phenomenon can occur as a side effect of some disease treatment drugs or methods in patients, often causing hemodynamic changes, which may lead to serious Life-threatening thrombosis or internal bleeding. Therefore, for some high-risk patients, it is very important to quickly detect the patient's healthy hemostasis and prevent thrombosis.

 

The researchers said that using this microfluidic device to simulate the hemodynamics of small blood vessels combined with * data analysis software can quickly quantify the patient's hemostatic capacity in real time, predict whether blood samples or patients will form a thrombus.